March / April 2018
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March / April 2018

Preparation for a new (Human) baby into a dog household.
By Sally Bradburry.

Create a safe place for your dog

A crate would work best to create a safe haven for your dog, his own space to relax in. Choose a comfortable sized crate; your dog should be able to stand up in it. Furnish it with a comfy sponge mattress and some blankets and follow the next steps to crate train your dog.

Step 1: Throw a couple of treats around the crate, bring your dog to the crate and let your dog find the treats on the floor. While your dog’s head is down, and he is sniffing the treats, drop a couple more treats for your dog to find. Then start to drop one treat at a time. Practise this for two minutes a day, three times a day. . . . . .

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November / December 2018
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November / December 2018

Dog And Coyote Interactions
Study uses YouTube videos to investigate Karen B. London PhD.

Dogs and coyotes are close relatives who encounter one another regularly in urban, suburban and rural areas, but how they behave around each other has not been well studied. It is hard to observe interactions between dogs and coyotes, but the modern world provides opportunities that were not available in the past.

Researchers interested in the nature of dog-coyote interactions . . .

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September / October 2018
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September / October 2018

What happens when clients get angry and how you can best manage it?
Niki Tudge Copyright 2015. An excerpt from People Training Skills for Pet Professionals – Your essential guide to engaging, educating and empowering your human clients

Anger can be an incredibly damaging force that can leave professional relationships floundering in its wake if it is not managed properly. Anger is a natural emotion that stems from a perceived threat or loss. Clients can become angry if they feel threatened, physically or otherwise, e.g. if we challenge their existing ideas, thoughts or actions regarding how they care for and train their pets. . . .

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July / August 2018
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July / August 2018

MISTAKES YOU’RE MAKING IN BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
Lisa Mullinax, ACDBC

I realize the title of this article seems a little judgey, so let me start by saying this: I have made all of these mistakes at various points in my career. Even now, I have times when something goes wrong in a training session and upon closer examination, I will spot one of these mistakes.
There’s no such thing as a perfect training or behavior modification session. I’ve been to lectures by some of the world’s best animal trainers and they have shown videos of themselves training a dog, beluga whale, or walrus and pointed out their training errors. We all make mistakes.. . . .

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May / June 2018
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May / June 2018

Dog Parks Are Dangerous!
By Nancy Kerns

Use extreme caution when taking your dogs to a dog park. Or better yet – don’t visit public dog parks at all.

I’ve never owned a dog that HAD to exercise at a fenced dog park, but I’ve fostered a number of them. I’ve been able to train all of my dogs to perform a solid recall, even when faced with tempting distractions (deer, rabbits, other hikers with dogs, etc.), and have always lived in places where I had access to off-leash trails.
But when I’ve fostered wayward adolescent dogs, there have been times when. . . . .

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February / March 2018
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February / March 2018

I got a shelter / rescue dog
By Taken from a talk given by Louise Thompson ABC of SA
Senior accredited animal behaviour consultant (Canine, feline, equine & avian)

INTRODUCTION

Many of us who are involved with animal rescue, tend to push adoptions as a good choice for owners wanting a new dog! We cajole, we beg, and are very quick to point out the advantages, the moral reasons, and the humanity of saving a life! However, we are often NOT so quick to point out the potential downside! Therefore, it’s not surprising that new owners often have totally unrealistic expectations of their new rescue dog! This can often result in a dog becoming “re-cycled” and ending up back in the system -something all rescuers and shelters want to avoid at all costs!. . . . . .

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