March / April 2018
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March / April 2018

Preparation for a new (Human) baby into a dog household.
By Sally Bradburry.

Create a safe place for your dog

A crate would work best to create a safe haven for your dog, his own space to relax in. Choose a comfortable sized crate; your dog should be able to stand up in it. Furnish it with a comfy sponge mattress and some blankets and follow the next steps to crate train your dog.

Step 1: Throw a couple of treats around the crate, bring your dog to the crate and let your dog find the treats on the floor. While your dog’s head is down, and he is sniffing the treats, drop a couple more treats for your dog to find. Then start to drop one treat at a time. Practise this for two minutes a day, three times a day. . . . . .

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December 2019 / January 2020
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December 2019 / January 2020

STUDY FINDS LINK BETWEEN JOINT PROBLEMS AND AROUSABILITY IN DOGS

By Linda Lombardi

A number of studies have found a relationship in humans between anxiety and a condition called joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). Now a study has found a parallel association in dogs. This provides insight into understanding this correlation in people, as well as providing something to think about in dogs with anxiety and dogs with hip problems . . .

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October / November / December 2019
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October / November / December 2019

Setting a standard for good horse welfare
by Valentina Kupresan-Jackson, Equine Behavioural Sciences Institute

In her 2003 article, Focus on animal welfare, Caroline Hewson stated, “…whatever we decide (about animal welfare) as a profession or as individuals, we must be knowledgeable” (Hewson, 2003).

This statement is of paramount significance as it highlights one of the reasons why good animal welfare standards can be challenging for many practitioners to achieve. When horse owners and practitioners lack the skills, experience and knowledge to identify good animal welfare practices, let alone implement and maintain them, the horses under their care may exhibit mental and physical states that are indicative of low welfare standards . . . 

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July / August / September 2019
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July / August / September 2019

Flooding: By Sally Bradburry.

Flooding Therapy is a technique of dog training that was one of the earliest attempts to change a dog’s behavior, or to be more precise, to change a certain behavioral response in a given situation. The purpose of flooding is to expose the dog to the stimulus that triggers the unwanted reaction at a close proximity and through a prolonged time of exposure, the dog should realize that there are no actual threats present therefore he will change his response to that stimulus in the future . . . .

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May / June 2019
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May / June 2019

Working with horses: Creating a positive experience – Valentina Kupresan-Jackson

DipEqSc, DipEqPsych, Equine Behavioural Sciences Institute

When broken down to its basic definition, the training of horses is essentially about promoting behaviours which we desire and are of value to us, while suppressing or eradicating behaviours which we find undesirable, in other words unwanted behaviours. In order to successfully achieve this, a trainer must know what behaviour is before they can begin to manipulate it. Behaviour is a process of actions and reactions performed by an individual in reaction to internal or external stimuli in context of the environment . . .

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March / April 2019
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March / April 2019

Of Dogs & Man by Drayton Michaels
The idea dogs have a moral imperative to disobey, be bad, or dominate one another or dominate humans is akin to racism and sexism, in the sense it creates a bias because it’s based in falsehoods. Dogs that are overly fearful can be aggressive to one another or to humans. There are layers to fearful and aggressive events. The agenda of dogs is safety first, food and water second, fun with other dogs or humans third . . .
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